Chandrayaan 3 launch date || Exploring the Exciting Journey

Chandrayaan 3 launch date

Chandrayaan 3 mission we are thrilled to provide you with an in-depth look at this groundbreaking lunar endeavor that promises to revolutionize space exploration. Join us as we delve into the fascinating details of Chandrayaan 3, including its mission objectives, spacecraft design, scientific goals, and potential impact on future space missions.

Chandrayaan-3 will launch on July 14, announces Isro chief – India

Chandrayaan 3: Pushing the Boundaries of Lunar Exploration

Mission Objectives

Chandrayaan 3 marks a significant milestone in India’s space exploration program, building upon the achievements of its predecessors, Chandrayaan 1 and 2. The mission aims to accomplish several key objectives:

  1. Lunar Sample Collection: The primary goal of Chandrayaan 3 is to collect lunar soil and rock samples, providing valuable insights into the moon’s geological history and potential resources.
  2. Technological Advancements: This mission showcases India’s expertise in developing advanced technologies, including lunar landing and rover capabilities, positioning the nation as a prominent player in the global space industry.
  3. International Collaboration: Chandrayaan 3 seeks to foster international collaboration, enabling the exchange of knowledge and resources with partner space agencies. This collaboration promotes scientific cooperation and mutual development.

Spacecraft Design

Chandrayaan 3 features a meticulously designed spacecraft that can withstand the challenges of lunar exploration. The spacecraft incorporates several notable design elements:

  • Lander and Rover: The mission utilizes a sophisticated lander and rover system, equipped with state-of-the-art instruments to facilitate scientific experiments and sample collection.
  • Improved Navigation and Landing: Chandrayaan 3 integrates advanced navigation and landing systems to ensure precise positioning and a safe touchdown on the lunar surface.
  • Enhanced Communication: The spacecraft is equipped with high-speed communication systems, enabling efficient data transfer between the lunar surface and mission control on Earth.

Scientific Goals

Chandrayaan 3 aims to achieve groundbreaking scientific goals that will significantly contribute to our understanding of the moon and its evolution. Key scientific objectives include:

  1. Geological Mapping: The mission will conduct detailed geological mapping, providing crucial data on the moon’s topography, mineralogy, and surface composition.
  2. Detection of Volatiles: Chandrayaan 3 will analyze the presence of volatiles, such as water ice, in the lunar regolith. This data will have profound implications for future human exploration and potential resource utilization.
  3. Seismic Studies: By studying lunar quakes and seismic activity, the mission will enhance our knowledge of the moon’s internal structure and geophysical processes.
  4. Understanding Lunar Evolution: Chandrayaan 3 will gather critical data to unravel the moon’s evolutionary history, shedding light on its formation, impact cratering, and volcanic activity.

The Impact of Chandrayaan 3 on Future Missions

The successful completion of Chandrayaan 3 will have far-reaching implications for future lunar missions and space exploration endeavors worldwide. Some potential impacts include:

  1. Inspiring Future Generations: Chandrayaan 3 will ignite the curiosity of young minds, inspiring the next generation of scientists, engineers, and space enthusiasts to pursue careers in STEM fields.
  2. Technological Advancements: The mission will drive technological advancements in space exploration, pushing the boundaries of innovation and encouraging the development of cutting-edge technologies for future missions.
  3. International Collaboration: Chandrayaan 3 will foster international collaboration, laying the foundation for joint space missions and knowledge-sharing initiatives among space agencies worldwide.
  4. Expanding Human Presence: The insights gained from Chandrayaan 3 will contribute to future plans for human exploration of the moon, facilitating the establishment of lunar bases and paving the way for long-term space habitation.

Chandrayaan-3 Overall Specifications:

  1. Mission Life (Lander & Rover): Approximately one lunar day (~14 Earth days)
  2. Landing Site (Prime): Latitude 69.367621° S, Longitude 32.348126° E, with a designated area of 4 km x 2.4 km
  3. Science Payloads:
    • Lander:
      • Radio Anatomy of Moon Bound Hypersensitive ionosphere and Atmosphere (RAMBHA): Measures near-surface plasma density.
      • Chandra’s Surface Thermo physical Experiment (ChaSTE): Measures thermal properties of lunar surface near the polar region.
      • Instrument for Lunar Seismic Activity (ILSA): Measures lunar seismicity and analyzes the lunar crust and mantle structure.
      • Laser Retroreflector Array (LRA): Passive experiment to understand the dynamics of the Moon system.
    • Rover:
      • Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS): Determines elemental composition (e.g., Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Fe) of lunar soil and rocks.
      • Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscope (LIBS): Performs qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis, infers mineralogical composition.
    • Propulsion Module:
      • Spectro-polarimetry of HAbitable Planet Earth (SHAPE): A payload focused on future discoveries of smaller exoplanets in reflected light for habitability assessments.
  4. Two Module Configuration:
    • Propulsion Module: Carries the Lander from launch injection to lunar orbit.
    • Lander Module: Accommodates the Rover inside.
  5. Mass:
    • Propulsion Module: 2148 kg
    • Lander Module: 1752 kg (including a 26 kg Rover)
    • Total: 3900 kg
  6. Power Generation:
    • Propulsion Module: 758 W
    • Lander Module: 738 W, with a power conditioning unit
    • Rover: 50 W
  7. Communication:
    • Propulsion Module: Communicates with the Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN)
    • Lander Module: Communicates with the IDSN and the Rover. Chandrayaan-2 Orbiter serves as a contingency link.
    • Rover: Communicates solely with the Lander.
  8. Lander Sensors:
    • Laser Inertial Referencing and Accelerometer Package (LIRAP)
    • Ka-Band Altimeter (KaRA)
    • Lander Position Detection Camera (LPDC)
    • Lander Hazard Detection & Avoidance Camera (LHDAC)
    • Laser Altimeter (LASA)
    • Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV)
    • Lander Horizontal Velocity Camera (LHVC)
    • Micro Star sensor
    • Inclinometer & Touchdown sensors
  9. Lander Actuators: Four reaction wheels (10 Nms & 0.1 Nm)
  10. Lander Propulsion System: Bi-propellant propulsion system (MMH + MON3) consisting of four 800 N throttleable engines and eight 58 N throttleable engines. It includes Throttleable Engine Control Electronics.
  11. Lander Mechanisms:
  • Lander leg
  • Rover Ramp (Primary & Secondary)
  • Rover
  • ILSA, RAMBHA & ChaSTE Payloads
  • Umbilical Connector Protection Mechanism
  • X-Band Antenna
  1. Lander Touchdown Specifications:
  • Vertical velocity: ≤ 2 m/secSure! Here’s the information you provided, restructured in a table format:
Sl No.ParameterSpecifications
1.Mission Life (Lander & Rover)One lunar day (~14 Earth days)
2.Landing Site (Prime)4 km x 2.4 km, Latitude: 69.367621° S, Longitude: 32.348126° E
3.Science PayloadsLander: RAMBHA, ChaSTE, ILSA, LRA; Rover: APXS, LIBS; Propulsion Module: SHAPE
4.Two Module ConfigurationPropulsion Module (Carries Lander from launch injection to Lunar orbit), Lander Module (Rover is accommodated inside the Lander)
5.MassPropulsion Module: 2148 kg, Lander Module: 1752 kg (including Rover of 26 kg), Total: 3900 kg
6.Power generationPropulsion Module: 758 W, Lander Module: 738W, Rover: 50W
7.CommunicationPropulsion Module: Communicates with IDSN, Lander Module: Communicates with IDSN and Rover, Rover: Communicates only with Lander
8.Lander SensorsLaser Inertial Referencing and Accelerometer Package (LIRAP), Ka-Band Altimeter (KaRA), Lander Position Detection Camera (LPDC), Lander Hazard Detection & Avoidance Camera (LHDAC), Laser Altimeter (LASA), Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV), Lander Horizontal Velocity Camera (LHVC), Micro Star sensor, Inclinometer & Touchdown sensors
9.Lander ActuatorsReaction wheels – 4 nos (10 Nms & 0.1 Nm)
10.Lander Propulsion SystemBi-Propellant Propulsion System (MMH + MON3), 4 nos. of 800 N Throttleable engines & 8 nos. of 58 N Throttleable Engine Control Electronics
11.Lander MechanismsLander leg, Rover Ramp (Primary & Secondary), Rover, ILSA, Rambha & Chaste Payloads, Umbilical connector Protection Mechanism, X- Band Antenna
12.Lander Touchdown specificationsVertical velocity: ≤ 2 m / sec, Horizontal velocity: ≤ 0.5 m / sec, Slope: ≤ 120

The objectives of scientific payloads planned on Chandrayaan-3 Lander Module and Rover are as follows:

Lander Payloads:

  1. RAMBHA (Radio Anatomy of Moon Bound Hypersensitive ionosphere and Atmosphere): Langmuir probe (LP) to measure near-surface plasma density and its changes over time.
  2. ChaSTE (Chandra’s Surface Thermo physical Experiment): Measure thermal properties of lunar surface near the polar region.
  3. ILSA (Instrument for Lunar Seismic Activity): Measure seismicity around the landing site and study the structure of the lunar crust and mantle.
  4. LRA (LASER Retroreflector Array): Passive experiment to understand the dynamics of the Moon system.

Rover Payloads:

  1. LIBS (LASER Induced Breakdown Spectroscope): Perform qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis, derive chemical composition, and infer mineralogical composition of the lunar surface.
  2. APXS (Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer): Determine theI apologize for any confusion. Here’s the information you provided in a structured table format:
Sl No.Lander PayloadsObjectives
1.RAMBHAMeasure near-surface plasma density and its changes over time using a Langmuir probe (LP).
2.ChaSTEStudy the thermal properties of the lunar surface near the polar region.
3.ILSAMeasure seismic activity, analyze the structure of the lunar crust and mantle.
4.LRAPassive experiment to understand the dynamics of the Moon system.
Sl No.Rover PayloadsObjectives
1.LIBSPerform qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis, infer mineralogical composition of the lunar surface.
2.APXSDetermine the elemental composition (e.g., Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Fe) of lunar soil and rocks near the landing site.
Sl No.Propulsion Module PayloadObjectives
1.SHAPEEnable future discoveries of habitable exoplanets through spectro-polarimetry of reflected light.

Chandrayaan 3 represents a monumental leap forward in lunar exploration, showcasing India’s scientific and technological prowess on the global stage. With its ambitious objectives, advanced spacecraft design, and potential impact on future missions, Chandrayaan 3 holds the key to unlocking new discoveries about the moon and the universe beyond. Stay tuned as we eagerly anticipate this groundbreaking mission that will shape the future of space exploration.

Source: ISRO